Housekeeping??

housekeepingI still laugh when I think about that scene from the movie “Tommy Boy” with the late Chris Farley and David Spade. If you don’t know the movie, and want some light, mindless fun, watch it some night, it’ll make you laugh.

Recently we conducted an end of the year physical inventory and while going through our records and reconciling all the data, the word “housekeeping” came to my mind. Housekeeping is an important part of a good operational plan–a very important part. Let me explain further.

Within Operations, and more specifically Supply Chain Management, we often focus on supplier qualification, capacity, lead times and costs. All of these are important ingredients that need our constant attention when it comes to producing a great product. Redundancy within the supply chain is another area of focus that we spend efforts with, to ensure we have adequate capacity in place as well as contingency plans for any changes or disruptions in our supply chain.

But what about housekeeping? Does your supplier (or contract manufacturer, or 3PL distribution partner) keep a clean house? When was the last time you visited them–possibly even unannounced (or perhaps with a short notice)? And I’m not referring to the cleanliness of their conference room or restrooms, but of their operational areas. This is a facet of supply chain management that is sometimes overlooked. Are materials properly inventoried, labeled and stored? Is it evident through looking at the various areas the type of work that is underway? How about documentation? In order and aligned with reality? These are just some of the questions that come to my mind when thinking about housekeeping as it relates to Operations.

I grew up in a household where there was much routine and order. My parents (although not from a military background) instilled in their children at a very early age the importance of keeping your room clean and in order. We had certain days of the week that were earmarked for certain activities, whether it be laundry, vacuuming, trash duty, etc. and we all had our chores assigned. As a teen it was a royal pain in my backside, but later in life I realized the importance of staying organized, both personally and professionally, and I came to appreciate the values I was taught. The concept stuck with me and grew with me, from just my room, to my house, my personal things (such as my vehicles), my office, and my operational responsibilities (suppliers, warehouses, etc.) in my career.

Great housekeeping can help your organization avoid issues such as incomplete or erroneous data, poor or inefficiency in space management and inventory management, slowed or difficult processes (such as inventory counts) and delayed or ineffective distribution of products through your fulfillment activities.

As you begin the new year, give some thought to housekeeping, and you’ll be rewarded immensely!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s