Having a Mentor

mentor

Taken from Wikipedia:

“Mentoring” is a process that always involves communication and is relationship based, but its precise definition is elusive. One definition of the many that have been proposed, is:
“Mentoring is a process for the informal transmission of knowledge, social capital, and the psychosocial support perceived by the recipient as relevant to work, career, or professional development; mentoring entails informal communication, usually face-to-face and during a sustained period of time, between a person who is perceived to have greater relevant knowledge, wisdom, or experience (the mentor) and a person who is perceived to have less (the protégé)”.
Fairly early in my career in Operations I had the benefit of reporting in to a tremendous mentor. I was working in the video game industry, and was hired by a local third party game products company to manage the supply chain activities, much of which revolved around strategic partnerships with several large Asian suppliers.
Although my mentor didn’t necessarily have to do so, he made a point of involving me in many high-powered meetings and trips abroad, both to Europe and the far East, as a part of my role within the company. It was a first hand educational process for me, and over the course of a couple of years the insights, discussions and training that I received were extremely helpful and shaped both my professional career as well as my professional ethics and conduct. The experience of working with this particular mentor (I’ve had the privilege of a couple of such relationships in my career) proved to be both immediately rewarding and valuable later in my life as well.
Recently I made a career move, heading back into a new tech startup full of bright, energetic engineers and staff that are now forging a new wave of technology and products that (I think) will soon shape everyone’s lives in one way or another—it’s just that big…anyway, upon leaving my former employer I wondered if I’d made any impact on my coworkers. A couple of days following my departure I received a card in the mail (very old school), from one of the young guys I had hired there, thanking me for my leadership, training and input in his life—and for getting him started, not only at that particular company, but with respect to his career as well. Without realizing it, I had been a mentor to him. Not only that—I had also yet another mentor in my own life while there—even in a smaller company, still a great opportunity to learn and grow.
Are you mentoring someone now? Making an impact in their life? Here are some suggestions for elements of great mentoring:

1. Great mentors are good communicators. They know how, when and why to communicate. They are generally easy to speak with, to ask questions, and they take time in their responses.
2. Great mentors have something to share. They are knowledge experts, not on every topic, but certainly on some topics. Through their own experience, education and career growth, they can offer insights not always found in the more mundane ways, such as a classroom setting. You can learn something from them.
3. Great mentors are reasonably humble in their approach. They don’t seek to be seen, or necessarily heard, they are sought out. Their wisdom becomes somewhat evident as you get to know them, not due to their own self-promotion.
4. Great mentors are an asset to their organizations. Fairly easy to understand this point—they make a positive difference in the lives of others on the team.
5. Great mentors are great people (based on my experiences). This will usually be the case—part of being a good mentor involves character qualities that are good and positive in other areas of life, not just while at work.

Are you mentoring someone now? Do you have a mentor in your life that is helping you grow, learn and become better not only as an employee but also as a person? We should all cultivate a spirit of mentorship within our lives and work communities. Education and experience are important attributes towards building a strong team, but do not lose sight of the importance of mentorship in your work and your life.  Have a relationship with someone who will teach you, lead you and help you to grow as a person–and do the same for someone else!

Housekeeping??

housekeepingI still laugh when I think about that scene from the movie “Tommy Boy” with the late Chris Farley and David Spade. If you don’t know the movie, and want some light, mindless fun, watch it some night, it’ll make you laugh.

Recently we conducted an end of the year physical inventory and while going through our records and reconciling all the data, the word “housekeeping” came to my mind. Housekeeping is an important part of a good operational plan–a very important part. Let me explain further.

Within Operations, and more specifically Supply Chain Management, we often focus on supplier qualification, capacity, lead times and costs. All of these are important ingredients that need our constant attention when it comes to producing a great product. Redundancy within the supply chain is another area of focus that we spend efforts with, to ensure we have adequate capacity in place as well as contingency plans for any changes or disruptions in our supply chain.

But what about housekeeping? Does your supplier (or contract manufacturer, or 3PL distribution partner) keep a clean house? When was the last time you visited them–possibly even unannounced (or perhaps with a short notice)? And I’m not referring to the cleanliness of their conference room or restrooms, but of their operational areas. This is a facet of supply chain management that is sometimes overlooked. Are materials properly inventoried, labeled and stored? Is it evident through looking at the various areas the type of work that is underway? How about documentation? In order and aligned with reality? These are just some of the questions that come to my mind when thinking about housekeeping as it relates to Operations.

I grew up in a household where there was much routine and order. My parents (although not from a military background) instilled in their children at a very early age the importance of keeping your room clean and in order. We had certain days of the week that were earmarked for certain activities, whether it be laundry, vacuuming, trash duty, etc. and we all had our chores assigned. As a teen it was a royal pain in my backside, but later in life I realized the importance of staying organized, both personally and professionally, and I came to appreciate the values I was taught. The concept stuck with me and grew with me, from just my room, to my house, my personal things (such as my vehicles), my office, and my operational responsibilities (suppliers, warehouses, etc.) in my career.

Great housekeeping can help your organization avoid issues such as incomplete or erroneous data, poor or inefficiency in space management and inventory management, slowed or difficult processes (such as inventory counts) and delayed or ineffective distribution of products through your fulfillment activities.

As you begin the new year, give some thought to housekeeping, and you’ll be rewarded immensely!